Sir Terry Pratchett (1948-2015)

Like most devoted readers of fantasy, I was stunned and saddened to learn that Terry Pratchett passed away last week at the age of 66. Pratchett always seemed to be one of those authors who would be just as delightful in person as he was through the pages of his books. To quote many other Pratchett fans, how could you not admire someone who wore this t-shirt to conventions? (See right.)

Others have already written much more eloquently than I could about Pratchett’s extraordinary literary output, the incisive wit of his writing, and the way he used the mad Discworld to make our own world seem equally ridiculous and magical in turn. But I spent much of last week re-reading Discworld favorites and looking up favorite Pratchett quotes, and I couldn’t resist sharing some of them here in celebration of an author whose voice I already miss.

I think my favorite Discworld books were the ones featuring Sam Vimes — especially Night Watch, arguably the best single novel in the Discworld series. The Vimes books showed off Pratchett’s remarkable gift for social commentary while skewering the usual conventions of the fantasy genre:

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes’ ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.
― Men at Arms

*

People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed, in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small-minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn’t that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.

As soon as you saw people as things to be measured, they didn’t measure up. What would run through the streets soon enough wouldn’t be a revolution or a riot. It’d be people who were frightened and panicking. It was what happened when the machinery of city life faltered, the wheels stopped turning and all the little rules broke down. And when that happened, humans were worse than sheep. Sheep just ran; they didn’t try to bite the sheep next to them.
Night Watch

*

Something Vimes had learned as a young guard drifted up from memory. If you have to look along the shaft of an arrow from the wrong end, if a man has you entirely at his mercy, then hope like hell that man is an evil man. Because the evil like power, power over people, and they want to see you in fear. They want you to know you’re going to die. So they’ll talk. They’ll gloat.

They’ll watch you squirm. They’ll put off the moment of murder like another man will put off a good cigar.

So hope like hell your captor is an evil man. A good man will kill you with hardly a word.
― Men at Arms

Pratchett also had a gift for skewering academia. File the following under “it’s funny because it’s true.”

Getting an education was a bit like a communicable sexual disease. It made you unsuitable for a lot of jobs and then you had the urge to pass it on.
― Hogfather

*

“But we’re a university! We have to have a library!” said Ridcully. “It adds tone. What sort of people would we be if we didn’t go into the library?”

“Students,” said Senior Wrangler morosely.
― The Last Continent

*

 “A book has been taken. A book has been taken? You summoned the Watch,” Carrot drew himself up proudly, “because some’s taken a bookYou think that’s worse than murder?”

The Librarian gave him the kind of look other people would reserve for people who said things like, “What’s so bad about genocide?”

― Guards! Guards!

Pratchett could write a funny and philosophical one-liner like no one else.

Evil begins when you begin to treat people as things.
― I Shall Wear Midnight

*

Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.
― Hogfather

 *

The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely to be preferred to the presence of those who think they’ve found it.
― Monstrous Regiment

Finally, let us all take a moment to appreciate the general brilliance of Where’s My Cow? — a fictional children’s book that Pratchett then made into awesome reality.

What are your favorite Pratchett quotes and books?

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